Neoclassical to focus your mind

David Chutka – “#22”
-This is neither the first nor probably the last time we’re featuring David Chutka’s work on our site. He is, simply, one of the best neoclassical artists we receive on a regular basis. The piano is conventional and fills your heart while also taking some unique twists and turns along the way. Chutka’s spirit oozes a sense of hopefulness through this nameless but beautiful track.

Marcel Heah – “Eves”
-Anyone who regularly reads my features on neoclassical music knows I’m not formally trained on any of them. Here’s how I descibe what I like about this song; the piano is conversational. It speaks in lines that make sense like voices. This entire piece feels like someone walking down a street talking to different voices – violin, other strings – along the way. It’s beautiful and I’d love to know more about the song itself.

The Ollie West Band – “Home”
-This musical piece is why neoclassical has such a varied meaning. It’s cinematic and orchestral; there are more strings and horns here than in almost any other band we’ve covered in months and we LOVE it. The rolling piano that enters the track in the mid point is absolutely stunning, mimicking some of the flourishes the orchestra introduced earlier. And despite usually saying no thanks to most vocals in neoclassical, we’re going to allow this one. There’s nothing like this in the world; you have to hear it.

Hauschka – “Curious”
-Here is another artist we’ve featured in the past and probably will in the future. Hauschka has a knack for piano phrasing that feels comfortable and engaging. You can’t quite guess where it will go, but you are ready to listen. The pauses are almost as effective as the notes. It’s a beautiful style perfect for reading or imagining something. It gives me great mental focus.

Klangriket – “Ljusterö”
-This is one of the most beautiful neoclassical pieces I’ve heard this year. I don’t know what it means or why it was written. I know very little about the artist. But what I feel is peacefulness in well-placed vibrating wires. This is human kindness captured in music. Each expressive line makes me feel something new. Listen carefully.

Nicholas Techer – “In Your Eyes”
-This neoclassical piece moves along brilliantly. There are some wonderful textures here that aren’t the typically sleepy style from the genre. It feels like an epic montage segment of a film or TV show. The piano sounds big and moving. It’s a dynamic little track about some apparently captivating eyes.

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